Septic work continues for Utica family’s mobile home

Efforts were being made Monday morning to correct a septic tank problem for a Utica family that has been plagued in recent weeks by the backup of raw sewage into their mobile home at the Hum Berry Trailer Park east of the village.Since the first of the year, Jamey and Dana Sebesta, who live with their 2 1/2-year-old daughter in a privately owned mobile trailer at the park, have had major plumbing problems nearly every time they have flushed the toilet or following “quick” showers.

“The sewage has been coming up through the shower drain or overflowing the toilet,” said Dana. “The smell and the clean up each time has been horrendous.” She said the underground tank has been uncovered and examined several times since January to no avail.

Watching a local septic company dig out the tank again Monday morning, trailer park owner Leah Blankenship told The Times she is doing her best to remedy the problem.

Septic work continues for Utica family’s mobile home

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 Septic work continues for Utica familys mobile homeseptic tank problems

Nockamixon weighing new septic tank rules

New septic tank rules will go into place soon. The township will be in compliance with Act 537 by the Department of Environmental Resources. New septic tank tank rules for Pennsylvania will require septic tanks to be inspected every 3 years. These septic tank rules includes the areas talked about in the article as required by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources.

Nockamixon weighing new septic tank rules

By this time next year, the more than 1,300 septic systems in Nockamixon Township could be required to get a cleaning every two years and the routine would be kept on file by township officials.

The routine cleaning would be part of the township’s effort to comply with Act 537, the state law requiring municipalities to have a comprehensive sewage treatment plan that includes all on-lot, private sewage systems.

On Tuesday, the township supervisors moved closer to finishing the township’s plan by approving some revisions asked for by officials with the state Department of Environmental Resources.

The revisions included a plan to monitor every three years the sewage systems in the village of Ferndale and the areas within Haycock Drive, William Road and Hellen Drive, which township engineer Steve Baluh said was considered high-density areas by the DEP.

Another revision was a requirement to expand a commercial system at Harrow Station on Route 611 if further development occurs in the shopping center.

The mandate to have septic tanks pumped-out every two years is something Baluh said is an integral part of the state law to promote maintenance of private systems to help them last longer and avoid failures.

“It’s required to put a plan in place to monitor maintenance and this plan requires they be pumped every two years and a receipt (from the company that pumped-out the tank) be sent to the township,” Baluh said.

One resident asked if all township systems would have to pumped when the law takes effect and why every two years.

Baluh said it has not been decided if all systems would have to be cleaned that year and supervisors Chairman Bill Sadow said the two-year mark was decided after many meetings, but is something that could be changed to no more than every three years.

“Regardless if it’s two or three, the county board of health says it can not be any more than three years,” Sadow said.

According to a spokesman at Bucks-Mont Environmental, a Doylestown-based septic cleaning company, the average cost to clean a tank is $200 to $300.

Such companies would have no authority or be required to contact the township when it completes a job or report a failed system, Baluh said.

If a system is found to be failing, Sadow said the pump company would tell the owner and it would be up to the owner to have it repaired or replaced.

“If the pumper says to need something like a new baffle (a component of the septic system) it’s up to you to fix. We’re not here to be the sewage police,” Sadow said.

The township plan is not expected to be in place and enforced until sometime next year.

Charles Malinchak is a freelance writer.

 

Nockamixon weighing new septic tank rules

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new septic tank rules article about new septic tank rules and regulations.

County may opt not to inspect septic tanks

Information about the Marion County plan to inspect septic tanks. Marion County, Florida may opt out of inspecting septic tanks. The septic tank inspection is required by a new Florida law intended to protect first magnitude springs in the area.

County may opt not to inspect septic tanks

A new state law enacted in April required the 19 Florida counties that are home to first-magnitude springs to adopt an evaluation program for septic systems by Jan. 1, 2013.

Marion County has three such bodies of water: Silver Springs, Rainbow Springs and Silver Glen Springs.

But the County Commission today will vote to opt out of the program, as the law allows local governments to do.

In a memo to the board, Assistant County Administrator Mounir Bouyounes, the county’s chief engineer, is recommending the board do so because state environmental regulators have announced new pollution control standards for Silver Springs — and will most likely do so for Rainbow Springs in the near future.

Part of the implementation process will identify sources of contamination, Bouyounes wrote.

Once those are uncovered, he added, “targeted responses” to deal with them would be developed, “which may include a focused effort” on septic tanks.

If the County Commission accepts Bouyounes’ recommendation, Marion would join 10 of the 18 other Florida counties with major springs in nixing the idea.

The rest have yet to take action on the state’s plan.

Under the new law, septic tanks would have to be inspected every five years. The county Health Department would oversee the inspections.

Health officials would have been responsible for lining up the private contractors who would conduct the inspections, setting the fees, analyzing the results and notifying the septic system owner if repairs or replacements were warranted.

The county would need to implement that through an ordinance

Dan Dooley, environmental administrator for the Marion County Health Department, said one benefit of participating would be gaining knowledge.

“We would get a good inventory of all the septic tanks in the county, something we don’t have now,” Dooley said.

He estimated Marion County has at least 90,000 septic systems.

Gov. Charlie Crist two years ago signed a bill that also required a statewide mandatory inspection program for all septic systems every five years.

But last year lawmakers chose not to fund it after rural communities complained that the mandate was overly intrusive. The new law repealed that initiative and scaled it back to counties with major springs.

Dooley added that one provision of the new measure requires more detailed reporting criteria.

If the county does not want to take part in the inspection program, the Health Department would continue its current steps to correct failed systems.

According to a Senate staff analysis of the bill, 99 percent of the estimated 2.67 million septic tanks in Florida “are not under any management or maintenance requirements.”

In three counties where they are, residents pay between $83 and $215 per inspection.

About half of those septic tanks were installed before 1983, which, according to the report, means those systems as well as “any illegally repaired, modified, or installed septic systems many not provide the same level of protection expected from systems permitted and installed under current construction standards.”

Some counties that have chosen to not participate — such as Hernando and Leon — have dissented after complaining about having insufficient time to comply.

The health of Rainbow and Silver springs has been in decline for years.

While officials have blamed a few possible sources — such as excessive fertilizer use at homes and golf courses and stormwater runoff from roadways and livestock waste — failing septic tanks are also on the list.

The city of Dunnellon has worked to remove septic tanks along the banks of the Rainbow River, which flows from the springs.

Meanwhile, the county has tried to find a strategy to deal with septic tanks around Silver Springs.

Last year the County Commission asked U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson to find $3 million in federal funding to set up a centralized water and sewer system around Silver Springs, noting in a letter that an “inadequate wastewater infrastructure” locally was a “major contributor” to explosion of nitrate levels in the waterway.

Contact Bill Thompson at 867-4117 or at bill.thompson@starbanner.com.

 

County may opt not to inspect septic tanks

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Trial in Ohio septic tank slaying moved

Very sad story.

Weird how the press picks up on a “title” to a crime and sticks with it. In this case, its the “septic tank” slaying.

Either way a women is dead and she ended up in a septic tank – very sad.

Trial in Ohio septic tank slaying moved

 

LOGAN, Ohio (AP) – The murder trial of a man charged in the slaying of his daughter-in-law – found strangled in a septic tank – has been moved to another southern Ohio county.

 

Hocking County Common Pleas Judge John Wallace said Tuesday that William Inman Sr.’s trial will be held in Chillicothe in Ross County. Wallace earlier granted the change-of-venue motion by Inman’s attorneys. Wallace said too many prospective jurors knew the facts of the case and had decided the question of Inman’s guilt.

 

The 48-year-old Inman is charged with aggravated murder and other crimes in the March 2011 slaying of 25-year-old Summer Inman. He faces a possible death penalty if convicted.

 

Inman’s wife and son were convicted earlier this year in the slaying.

 

Chillicothe is about 40 miles southwest of Logan.

 

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Trial in Ohio septic tank slaying moved

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Septic tank registration a con job, says TD McGrath

This article is straight from Ireland. Not sure I’ve seen reporting quite like this before. It seems they found a man, McGrath, that says registration of septic tanks would be unnecessary. Stop the presses. A local resident doesn’t want to pay an extra septic tank fee. I’m shocked.
Seriously though, registration of septic tanks and periodic inspections is a good idea. Particularly with older septic systems. I doubt the cost would be prohibitive.

Septic tank registration a con job, says TD McGrath

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

Homeowners in rural Ireland are not complying with a ministerial directive to register septic tanks, according to a TD who called the process “a con job”.

South Tipperary Independent TD Mattie McGrath said most rural residents were sceptical about the purpose of the registration fee.

His comments came as it emerged only 6% of households affected by the directive have registered their septic tanks.

Environment Minister Phil Hogan made registration compulsory in June. Anyone who has not registered before Sept 28 faces an increased €50 registration fee. At present, it costs just €5 to register the tank.

The 2011 census revealed there are more than 497,000 septic tanks and other on-site waste water treatment systems in the country.

“If the local authorities wanted to find out who has tanks and who doesn’t, they can just look at the post-1964 register,” said Mr McGrath.

“After last year’s census, the local authorities have even more information on who has tanks.

“One local authority official had seen so much data that he could tell me that there are 80 householders in South Tipp who don’t have a septic tank at all. They’re the kind of people that don’t have running water, electricity or a regular toilet and are happy out.

“It is a con job, this registration process. The department just wants to bring in more money for the local authorities. People know that. I’ve also been getting calls from people who are concerned that every Tom, Dick, and Harry will be able to do the inspections. It’s a joke.”

The inspections will begin once the Department of the Environment’s registration process is completed at the end of Jan 2013.

There has been much opposition to the registration, as some people fear it could lead to upgrade costs of €3,000 to €15,000.

They also believe the legislation discriminates against rural Ireland, as people in urban areas avail of public water treatment facilities.

Yesterday, the department said septic tank inspectors would be hired using strict criteria.

The first areas to be targeted by the inspection teams are areas believed to be at high risk of ground water pollution due to inefficient waste water treatment.

Septic tank owners must ensure their tanks are working properly and do not cause a risk to human health or the environment.

Septic tank registration a con job, says TD McGrath

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Aerator Septic System

Aerator Septic System

An  aerator septic system is an incorrect term. An aerobic treatment system or ATS is more correct and used more widely by industry professionals. A aerobic septic system is a small scale sewage treatment system similar to a septic tank system  but which uses an aerobic process for digestion rather than just the anaerobic process used in septic systems. These systems are commonly found in rural areas where public sewers are not available, and may be used for a single residence or for a small group of homes.

Unlike the traditional septic system, the aerobic treatment system produces a high quality secondary effluent, which can be sterilized and used for surface irrigation. This allows much greater flexibility in the placement of the leach field, as well as cutting the required size of the leach field by as much as half.

Residential wastewater is a large issue. Visit www.reducefog.info for more information about wastewater, wastewater treatment, sewage treatment and lift stations.

Official: Inspection cover lid to septic tank easily removable

A game of hide and seek may have gone horribly wrong when a toddler ends up in a septic tank. This is a tragic story and believe it or not many people die each year in septic tanks.
Make sure septic tan lids are closed and not easily removable.

Official: Inspection cover lid to septic tank easily removable

SMITH COUNTY, TX (KLTV) -

The full autopsy for the East Texas boy who was found dead in the septic tank behind his family’s home is expected to be back by Wednesday.

 

Two-year-old Jake Kimbley was reported missing last Tuesday afternoon. His body was found 12 hours later in his family’s septic tank.

 

While Jake Kimbley’s body was sent off for autopsy Wednesday, the complete results are still pending. Now pathologists will need to do more microscopic testing and studies to better determine how or why Jake died.

 

Monday, for the first time in almost a week, authorities are no longer guarding the property. Jake’s grandmother says Jake’s death was just a horrible accident.

 

“The honest truth… it’s just a child’s game gone bad. Point blank. They were all playing hide-and-go-seek and it just went wrong,” says Laura Herber.

 

Smith County Precinct 4 Judge Mitch Shamburger drew a picture of the septic tank lid in an effort to better explain what exactly Jake was under. Judge Shamburger was on the scene and pronounced Jake dead around 1:30 a.m. Wednesday.

 

Judge Shamburger says the green part in the picture (see right) is the dome-like cover. That cover is about 36 inches in diameter. The black hole is the “clean out” or “inspection hole.” That opening is about 10 to 12 inches in diameter. The black hole is how the sanitation companies clean out the tank.

 

Judge Shamburger says it’s still unclear if the lid to the inspection hole was on or off, but he did say it is easily removable.

 

Another photo of a septic tank lid online (see right) shows a lid similar to the one on the tank Jake was inside. Except, the Kimbley family’s septic tank wasn’t cracked and it only had one inspection hole, not two.

 

How exactly Jake got into the septic tank still has yet to be determined. While investigators continue to determine if what happened to Jake Kimbley was an accident, his five siblings remain in foster care in the custody of child protective services.

 


 

 Official: Inspection cover lid to septic tank easily removableseptic tank problems

County Commission rejects state mandate for septic tank inspections

Marion County Commission rejects the idea of septic tank inspections. The reason for the proposed septic tank inspections was Marion county is home to first magnitude springs.

The county is developing its own plan to protect the springs at Silver Springs and Rainbow Springs. Should a thorough anaysis indicate that septic tank runoff wastewater is having a negative impact on  the environment of the springs, the county may agree to septic tank inspections at a later date.

If implemented, septic tank inspections will be pay for by the homeowner. Although the cost of the septic tank inspections was not discussed at the meeting, $100 per septic tank inspection is anticipated. The septic tank inspection, if implemented, would occur once every for years.

County Commission rejects state mandate for septic tank inspections

The County Commission on Tuesday voted unanimously to reject a state mandate to set up an inspection program for the county’s 90,000 plus septic tanks.

State lawmakers wanted to have a grasp on how leaky septic systems could be affecting first-magnitude springs, defined as those pumping 65 million gallons of fresh water a day, in the 19 counties that have them. Marion is home to three such springs, out of a total of 33 statewide.

The Legislature created a program calling for mandatory septic tank inspections in those communities, with the assessment conducted at the property owner’s expense.

Counties were supposed to vote to enact those programs by Jan. 1, 2013. Yet 10 counties have balked since the law was passed in April. Marion made it 11 on Tuesday.

County Administrator Lee Niblock explained that the county was developing management plans for the watersheds around Silver and Rainbow springs.

Staff, Niblock said, didn’t believe it was necessary to establish the inspection program until that plan and the state’s effort to set maximum pollution levels for the springs were complete.

Assistant County Administrator Mounir Bouyounes, the county’s chief engineer, added that process could identify septic tanks as a source of the contaminants affecting both springs and steps to curtailing that would be taken once that is confirmed.

“The science is still not certain as to the amount of loading that septic tanks are putting on ground water and some of those kinds of things, and so I think it’s a cost to the taxpayers that they don’t need to bear at this point,” Commissioner Stan McClain said.

The state is expected to announce those pollution limits in the fall.

In other action on Tuesday, the County Commission:

Voted to increase the cost of an ambulance ride.

Previously, the county charged between $300 and $575 for ambulance service, depending on the level of care the patient requires. The new rates run from $400 to $658 and took effect Tuesday.

The board’s unanimous vote also upped the per-mile charge, from $8.50 to $10.16.

It was the first increase in emergency-service rates since October 2008, when the county took over the ambulance fleet from the now-defunct Emergency Medical Services Alliance, a public-private partnership.

County officials say the portion of the cost covered by insurance depends on the patient’s plan.

The rate hikes are expected to generate an additional $880,000 a year.

Killed contracts related to two high-profile initiatives.

In June 2010 the county went with California-based Aramark as a supplier of uniforms to most county departments needing them. The move was intended to save money by consolidating all the uniforms under one vendor.

But commissioners terminated the deal Tuesday after employees reported getting back the wrong or damaged uniforms that had been sent for cleaning — if they got them back at all.

Secondly, the board cut loose Washington-based VS Consulting, which had been hired in December 2010 to help secure federal funding to entice alternative energy companies to the community.

Rick Michael, the county’s economic development director, recommended the contract be ended in order to not duplicate efforts by the new Ocala-Marion County Chamber and Economic Partnership, the group that emerged from the merger of the Economic Development Corp. and the Chamber of Commerce.

The county had paid VS Consulting $307,723 since December 2010 as one initiative under Niblock’s 25-point Doing More for JOBS economic development plan.

Honored Chief Towles Bigelow of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office for his lengthy career in local law enforcement.

The board adopted a proclamation declaring Tuesday “Towles Bigelow Day,” in honor of Bigelow celebrating 51 years as a local crime fighter this month.

Bigelow has spent 40 years with the Sheriff’s Office and worked as the chief investigator at the State Attorney’s Office between 1973 and 1984. He is retiring by the end of the year.

Removed itself from the hiring of top staffers.

Since at least 1992, county ordinances required the board to ratify the county administrator’s choices for department heads.

But the board excised that provision Tuesday, saying they preferred to hold the administrator — one of two employees who works directly for the commission — accountable for the staff’s performance.

In related news:

Marion County Fire Rescue has received a donation of $20,000 in rescue equipment from groups that use the Marjorie Harris Carr Cross Florida Greenway.

The donation, which included a match from the state, purchased all-terrain vehicles and trailers that will make it easier to transport people who get sick or injured along the more than 100 miles of trails within the Greenway.

Doug Shearer, head of the Florida Greenways and Trails Foundation, said contributions for the equipment came from groups both within and outside Marion County, illustrating the facility’s popularity as a regional recreation site.

Marion County has added an estimated 1,244 people between April 2011 and this past April, bringing Marion’s overall population to 332,989.

Sixty percent of those new residents moved to unincorporated Marion.

The figures, calculated by the Bureau of Economic and Business Research at the University of Florida, are used primarily to determine the county’s portion of state-shared revenues.

Contact Bill Thompson at 867-4117 or at bill.thompson@starbanner.com

 

County Commission rejects state mandate for septic tank inspections

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 County Commission rejects state mandate for septic tank inspectionsseptic tank problems

County may opt not to inspect septic system tanks

We’re starting to see more and more regulations of septic systems at the state level. Unfortunately,  this law allows local governments to opt out of the program.

You may remember that then Gov. Christ signed a law requiring septic systems in Florida get inspected every 5 years. That too was scraped when law makers decide not to fund the program.

I’m not sure why Florida is so anti septic tank inspection.

Anyway, go figure, the health of the local bodies of water is getting worse. In particular nitrates continue to be a problem.

I for one, would like to see 5 year septic system inspections. The cost would only be around 100 dollars (every 5 years).  Since Florida has almost 3 million septic systems, periodic inspections would seem to make sense.

County may opt not to inspect septic systems tanks

A new state law enacted in April required the 19 Florida counties that are home to first-magnitude springs to adopt an evaluation program for septic systems by Jan. 1, 2013.

Marion County has three such bodies of water: Silver Springs, Rainbow Springs and Silver Glen Springs.

But the County Commission today will vote to opt out of the program, as the law allows local governments to do.

In a memo to the board, Assistant County Administrator Mounir Bouyounes, the county’s chief engineer, is recommending the board do so because state environmental regulators have announced new pollution control standards for Silver Springs — and will most likely do so for Rainbow Springs in the near future.

Part of the implementation process will identify sources of contamination, Bouyounes wrote.

Once those are uncovered, he added, “targeted responses” to deal with them would be developed, “which may include a focused effort” on septic tanks.

If the County Commission accepts Bouyounes’ recommendation, Marion would join 10 of the 18 other Florida counties with major springs in nixing the idea.

The rest have yet to take action on the state’s plan.

Under the new law, septic tanks would have to be inspected every five years. The county Health Department would oversee the inspections.

Health officials would have been responsible for lining up the private contractors who would conduct the inspections, setting the fees, analyzing the results and notifying the septic system owner if repairs or replacements were warranted.

The county would need to implement that through an ordinance

Dan Dooley, environmental administrator for the Marion County Health Department, said one benefit of participating would be gaining knowledge.

“We would get a good inventory of all the septic tanks in the county, something we don’t have now,” Dooley said.

He estimated Marion County has at least 90,000 septic systems.

Gov. Charlie Crist two years ago signed a bill that also required a statewide mandatory inspection program for all septic systems every five years.

But last year lawmakers chose not to fund it after rural communities complained that the mandate was overly intrusive. The new law repealed that initiative and scaled it back to counties with major springs.

Dooley added that one provision of the new measure requires more detailed reporting criteria.

If the county does not want to take part in the inspection program, the Health Department would continue its current steps to correct failed systems.

According to a Senate staff analysis of the bill, 99 percent of the estimated 2.67 million septic tanks in Florida “are not under any management or maintenance requirements.”

In three counties where they are, residents pay between $83 and $215 per inspection.

About half of those septic tanks were installed before 1983, which, according to the report, means those systems as well as “any illegally repaired, modified, or installed septic systems many not provide the same level of protection expected from systems permitted and installed under current construction standards.”

Some counties that have chosen to not participate — such as Hernando and Leon — have dissented after complaining about having insufficient time to comply.

The health of Rainbow and Silver springs has been in decline for years.

While officials have blamed a few possible sources — such as excessive fertilizer use at homes and golf courses and stormwater runoff from roadways and livestock waste — failing septic tanks are also on the list.

The city of Dunnellon has worked to remove septic tanks along the banks of the Rainbow River, which flows from the springs.

Meanwhile, the county has tried to find a strategy to deal with septic tanks around Silver Springs.

Last year the County Commission asked U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson to find $3 million in federal funding to set up a centralized water and sewer system around Silver Springs, noting in a letter that an “inadequate wastewater infrastructure” locally was a “major contributor” to explosion of nitrate levels in the waterway.

Contact Bill Thompson at 867-4117 or at bill.thompson@starbanner.com.

 

County may opt not to inspect septic tanks

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 County may opt not to inspect septic system tanksstate septic tank agency information septic tank problems

Walworth County septic court is ghost town – Janesville Gazette

Article about septic systems in Walhorn County. Septic systems there must be certified every three years. Private companies must inspect the septic systems every three years or homeowners will be fined.

Walworth County septic court is ghost town Septic Systems

— Fifty-six Walworth County residents were called into court Wednesday accused of failing to comply with the state’s private sewage system maintenance program. Only two on the list showed up to talk about their septic systems.

At issue is a state mandate requiring owners of property served by a private sewage system to certify maintenance of the system by having the tank pumped and/or inspected by a licensed maintenance provider. Failure to comply results in a $663 citation and a court order requiring that the system be inspected and in compliance with the maintenance program.

“We have at least 6,000 systems that need to be certified,” said Michael Cotter, director of the Walworth County Land Use and Resource Management Department. “Every year we have several landowners who won’t comply with the state requirement. We then begin the court process.”

Landowners with private septic systems must certify compliance every three years. The county sends a notice explaining the requirement and directing the landowner to have a service provider verify that the inspection and any maintenance or repairs have been completed.

If the landowner does not respond within 30 days of receipt of the notice, a second notice is sent out explaining to the landowner that if nothing is done within 15 days, a $150 processing fee will be added on to the $663 citation.

“We had three people show up today and one of them was already in compliance but just wanted to make sure,” said county code enforcement officer Rick Dorgay as he looked around the empty courtroom. “So only two on the court list showed up, and we have agreed to continue their cases to try to work something out.”

Bill Foley of Fontana was one of the two landowners who attended Wednesday’s court hearing.

“My house burned down in October 2011, and I don’t get mail there,” Foley said. “I

wasn’t getting the notices.”

Foley said he was in court to cooperate with the state and county.

“I intend to begin construction on the new house next spring,” he said. “I’m working with Rick (Dorgay) to get this settled.”

Dorgay said the 54 residents on the court list who did not show up for their court appearance will be notified that a judgment has been entered against them, and they must pay the $663 citation and a $150 processing fee.

“What’s important for those people to understand is that they not only must now pay the citation and fee, they are still required to comply with the maintenance program,” Dorgay said. “They gained nothing by not showing up in court today.”

The cost to comply with the maintenance program depends on the condition of the septic system, Dorgay said.

“If the system has been maintained and in good condition, it could cost as little as $75 to have a service provider sign off on the compliance card after an inspection,” he said. “Many landowners combine the inspection with pumping out the tank for an additional $100 to $150.”

If the system has been neglected, the cost to comply could run into thousands of dollars.

“Some landowners are reluctant to comply because they know it will be expensive,” Dorgay said. “In some cases, the system will have to be replaced.”

Failure to comply and failure to pay costs in the judgment could escalate into more serious court action, Cotter said.

“If the citation and processing fee are not paid, they could be put on the property tax roll,” he said. “If the property taxes aren’t paid, well, then we get into another area. In a worst case situation, we could be looking at taking the property, and that’s something we do not want to do.”

Dorgay said the county is not looking at enforcement of the septic maintenance program as a source of revenue.

“We would rather not have to be involved in this part of the enforcement,” he said. “It’s much better for all involved if the inspection and maintenance are completed every three years.”